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in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? i do.ndistinct conversations >> congratulations, senator. [indistinct conversations] [laughter] >> okay. [indistinct conversations] >> will you pull that back a little bit? >> you have to pull back so we can see the most important part of this team. please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
homes. because of the demand in housing . all of a sudden into the congress of the united states of the says we are going to put the full faith and credit of the united states of america on a 90-day leash. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gent
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
karzai. we're there for the benefit of the united states. as long as there is a threat that comes from afghanistan, al qaeda, as long as afghanistan could be in the future used as a potential safe haven against people in the united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there.safee united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there. and we have to remember first principles. we're there for the defense of the american mainland and american people. >> always good to get your thoughts. appreciate it, sir. >> take care. >>> in december russias passed a law banning u.s. adoptions. that left hundreds in limbo wondering what were happening to the children they were already in the process of adopting. now there may be some hope for those people. >>> one problem after another this week if boeing 787 dream liner. now the u.s. government weighing in. >>> also coming up, it is the first and only exhibition of its kind to ever tour the united states featuring 150 mummies. fr r. clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've got nine grams of protein. that's three times
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you will bear the true faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i do. >> congratulations, senator. [inaudible conversations] >> your gracious for letting them go first. right here. elaine knows what she's doing. look at that. would you please raise your right -- right there, okay. please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you will bear the true faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i do. >> good seeing you
personnel, ready for this event. we have snipers on the roofs. we have biological and chemical units prepared to deal with whatever comes up. we have a high degree of surveillance. satellites zooming in on the mall, as well as hundreds of surveillance cameras, to watch potential suspects. as one official told me last night, we have no specific threat. but we have to be ready for anything, george. >> and i know they've been preparing for this for a year. they've been locking the buildings on the parade route. they've been locking the garbage cans on the parade route. repaved the road. they are taking no chances. we have an incredible team of presidential savvy with us this morning. i want a quick word from two of them sitting with us here. let's start with matthew dowd, contributor to abc news. you have contributed to a combine, as well. both sides of the aisle. what does it take for a president to take a second inauguration and make it soaring? >> well, it's a much different situation when you go from the first to the second. the first one, everybody's filled with hope. we can make c
for giving me the privilege of representing that beautiful and diverse city in the congress of the united states. each of us here today is truly a representative. a representative in the truest sense of the word. to represent the highest hopes and aspirations of the american people. on new year's eve, some of you, a large number of members of congress joined hundreds of people at the national archives building where we observed at midnight the 150th anniversary of the signing of the emancipation proclamation. at midnight there was an enactment of harriet tubman ringing the bill, ringing the bill. and as she rang the bell she said, now we are free. it was quite an incredible moment. and it was one that ushered in what president lincoln would call a new birth of freedom. for his era and for generations to come. that transformative moment in our history is a reminder of the best traditions we have as a people. the ability and obligation of each generation of americans to renew the promise of our founders. to carry forth the torch of progress. to reignite the american dream. this is who we ar
in to a booming business birth tourism. four women giving birth in the united states so their kids will be citizens and it's not from where you would expect. let's go ""outfront."" >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, the battle over super storm sandy. so the house of representatives is going to vote tonight, really just imminently, on a 49 house republicans voted against the final bill and we will speak to one in a moment this may sound like an easy vote to you because disaster relief always gets approved but when it comes to spending this country's money every dollar counts. as we saw with the fiscal cliff battle not everyone in washington thinks this kind of money is worth it. >> $16 billion is to quintuple the size of the community of development grant block program the slush program that pays for projects such as doggy day care centers and doesn't have to be spent in the hurricane area. $2 billion is for highway repairs, anywhere in the country including up to $20 million each for guam, american is a mow ya and the mariana islands isn't in the same ocean as
is are we united in drying that up from the people i have talked to? the answer is yes. krystal ball, when you have lost the socialites, i believe the republicans have nothing left to lose. >> well, it -- >> what else is there? this is rock bottom? >> it looks pretty bleak. >> a hack, fundraiser. >> she had strong words there, well, i was looking back at the analysis "the washington post" did last summer regarding the republican party, and the sort of old republicans which i assume she is, fiscally conservative, typically northeastern, typically well off still make up about 22% of the party. so a decent chunk of the party. and what georgeette there shows, they make up a certain amount of the funding base which is why they have had a lock on the republican party. and the innovation for the growth of the tea party is their ability to have larger scale donor movements, smaller dollar to add up to a larger amount. and for a while, the georgeettes of the world in 2010 were willing to ride the wave, because sure we were electing crazy people but they were in other districts. now they see how the
is that the united states government now spends more on immigration enforcement than on all other principal law enforcement agencies combined. we are spending as of fiscal year 2011, which is the most recent year for the data that we're using that was available, that's the price tag of $18 billion. that is 24% greater than the $14.4 billion that funds the f.b.i., the d.e.a., the secret service, the a.t.f. and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal, because in 1986 when this all began, i.n.s. comprised 28% of the spending of all of the other law enforcement agencies. and if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that very clearly shows this and what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement by far is the largest share of this spending. it's the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions, and among other things it's made possible the doubling of the border patrol in just the last eight years from $10,819 to where it stands today which is in the neighborhood of 2
" investigation into a booming business, birth tourism. foreign women giving birth in the united states so their kids will be citizens, but this time, we're not talking about people south of the border. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, the battle over super storm sandy. so the house of representatives is going to vote tonight, really just imminently, on a controversial relief package for the victims of the devastating october 29th storm. a $17 billion aid package was approved earlier today and at this moment, another $34 billion is at stake. i know this might sound like an easy vote because disaster relief always gets approved but right now, when it comes to spending this country's money, every single dollar is getting subjected to scrutiny and just as we saw with the fiscal cliff battle, not everyone in washington thinks this disaster relief should pass. >> $16 billion is to quintuple the size of the grant program, the slush fund that pays for such dubious projects as doggy day care centers. it doesn't even have to be spent in the hurricane area
in the united states so their kids will be citizens and it's not from where you would expect. let's go ""outfront."" >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, the battle over super storm sandy. >> if you listen to the republican critics, they say the pork is everywhere in this $34 billion amendment that the democrats tacked on to this emergency spending measure for superstorm sandy. take a look. it includes $194 million for the national oceanic atmospheric organization. it will give $2 billion for repairing roads virtually anywhere after a natural disaster including, yes, guam which is ,000 miles from where sandy struck, more than $100 million for amtrak to end to its trains and tracks in the northeast corridor even though it looks like less than a third would involve repairs related to sandy and it's damage. and the amendment includes $16 billion for the department of housing and urban development to help with disaster relief, rebuilding an economic revitalization but not just in sandy's path, in any disaster zone anywhere in the country. that is what the critics have be
if the president won't negotiate on the debt ceiling. and one of our guests says the next president of the united states will be black. and why one politician accused of a crime was stripped and beaten. we'll show it to you. let's go "outfront." >>> good friday evening, everyone. i'm erin burnette. "outfront" tonight, on the brink of battle. a threat today from a top republican to shut down the government if president obama refuses to negotiate over the debt ceiling. the second most powerful republican in the senate, minority whip john cornyn of texas wrote in an op-ed today, president obama needs to take note of this reality and put forward a plan to avoid it immediately. will those threats work? a senior democrat says if the republicans don't want to raise the debt ceiling, it will be on their shoulders. >> risking government shutdown, risking not raising the debt ceiling is playing with fire. >> playing with fire. douglas holtz-eakin is the former director of the congressional budget office. robert reich is a former u.s. labor secretary and author of a book that explains how we all feel these
in the united states these policy makers is that coca isn't cocaine. indigenous people shouldn't be punished because some people refined into cocaine and abuse state and there's great value and this is an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people and the arrogance by which the foreign policy traced to dictate terms and countries like bolivia less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia and set in the united states. and the heavy-handed nature of the policy would think this is some kind of a flood from bolivia the way that we dictate terms in this country. now imagine if the united nations and the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way with the content they treat coca what would happen if they tell oblivion's chewing coca which they'd been doing for centuries if not thousands of years imagine if they did that to the united states you have to give up this habit now. she was a major that went to elmhurst college, and in 2001 he comes by europe with the administration to secretly them coffee for one day without notice during finals week as a project so all these students get up in the mo
years and a federal prosecutor as united states attorney for four and a half years. the best laws on the books are dead letter unless enforced, so we need more resources. absolutely right. both at the state and federal level to enforce existing laws and if that executive action or order involves more resources or more vigorous enforcement of existing laws, improving that national database, the national enforcement criminal background system, all to the better. >> so, you're saying the executive order, that the president could do, could be you know, putting more people, more resources, more money into existing laws. he can do that via executive order? >> well, he may need an appropriation from congress for major amounts of money, but remember, we're not talking about huge amounts of funding. the national database appropriation last year was $5 million. that's million. not billion. $5 million, which is a drop in the bucket for the connecticut state budget, not to mention the national budget. but here's the main thing. i proposed a bill that would involve better enforcement of existi
or it will have a huge drag on the united states economy. once again, revisit the issue for the first time in american history. it is not a perfect package. it is something that gets us by while we tackle the large issues in the next congress. >> we are confronted with a bill that, if the vote full voting- age allow us to go over the ceiling or we can try to come together and pass something that neither tside of the aisle will agree with 100 percent. -- 100%. we do not have to can to new fighting. we have got to make sure parrot what i fin. maybe we are moving in the right direction and maybe we are moving toward -- forward. >> we expect them back any minute now. we do not know yet exactly what all happened -- what will happen. what we are hearing from several different sources is the rules committee is going to bring it up and it will be a straight up or down vote on the senate bill. the house will come back into session any minute now. off.ight have to cut an let's hear more voices. here are tweets -- let's hear voices on the phone. linda, what do you think? >> i do not think they know h
united, james salt to talk about some of the themes in the president's inhermanal address. now, we know beyonce wasn't really singing. do you care? but first. >> sean peyton was reinstated after serving a year-long suspension for being part of the bounty hit program last year. the coach released a statement saying he was thankful to be on the job and takes responsibility for all aspects of his few football program and mistakes were indeed made. he looks forward to coaching the saints, thanks to his supporters. >> he is going to coach the saints? he said he still works for them and is working forward to it >> bill: we love redemption. >> it was quite an after party after the inaugural ball. the washington post supports katie perry and ashley judd and others were at the executive mansion until 2:30 in the morning partying it up. >> that's when katie perry tweeted she had been at the best party ever. president obama and the first lady were there, too. no word on how late they stayed >> bill: i have been when bill clinton was in the white house, i have been
refuses to give the united states the ability to pay its bills on time, the consequences could be catastrophic. our entire economy could suffer for it. our family and businesses can't afford that dangerous game again. >> molly: congress has two months to fix the debt ceiling problem before the u.s. may have to default on its bills. >> jamie: what kind of reaction did we hear from republicans? >> molly: republicans agreed for the push for higher taxes during the fiscal cliff battle now want to tackle spending and they see raising the debt limit as part of the spending problem. they want more bipartisan negotiations and less campaigning. >> it looks like the second term of barack obama is going to be in your face term. i'm not going to talk to you at all about the debt ceiling. we've yet to cut one dime from the debt ceiling agreement and now time to do it again. we have to stop the madness. >> molly: chris van hollen it's reckless and irresponsible not to pay bills that are due. >> jamie: thanks, molly. >> gregg: president obama signing that $9.7 billion super storm sandy aid bi
oil companies in the united states. they are here because they don't get those kind of benefits in norway or sweden. i get gas royalties out of ohio from a french company. they get 30% they don't even pay tax on. we have to run a country. i think simpson-bowles is the right direction, but i don't think simpson-bowles goes far enough. at one time i thought steve forbes' idea was great, but he wants to keep a certain piece of money that is an entitlement. guest: and makes a very good point that we have got to have the kind of pro-growth tax reform that simplifies the system, broadens the base, lower rates, but that stimulates economic growth and economic development. that means not only getting people back to work but it is the growing economy that creates more revenue, not higher taxes. the growth and the revenues from growth is what we really need to address the deposition and debt. often we don't focus on that enough in the scoring, like the cbo, congressional budget office scoring you see all the time, the revenue from growth is not factored in. in anything we put together a,
on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during the obama administration, 1.5 million. for the entirity of the bush administration, two terms in office, we saw about two million deportations. and then in 2012 alone, nearly -- more than, rather, 400,000 immigrants deported, which is a record high. our next phone call is from mark in new jersey, republican. hi, mark. caller: good morning. i'm also a municipal chair here for the republican committee. i'm al
, was their ability to compromise. the very structure of this institution, the united states congress, the very structure of our institution, which joined the people's house, where we are all privileged to serve, with the united states senate, was known as what? the connecticut compromise, or the great compromise. that is the very basis of our founders. too often we forget that while we should never, we should never compromise our principles, we must always, mr. speaker, we must always be prepared to compromise in the service of our principles. a couple weeks ago, "the economist" described another example of compromise -- this one that justice brandeis described as "one of the laboratories of democracy." the state of georgia. conservative republican governor, are former house colleague, and the liberal mayor of atlanta, are clearly at opposite ends of the political spectrum. yet they have managed to bridge the divide with a commitment to results. mr. speaker, together they have achieved significant gains for the good of georgia. mr. speaker, congress and the white house are perfectly capable of
direct part in new un sanctions. this is in the wake of new north korean threats against the united states. cnn pentagon correspondent looked into how dangerous the nuclear capability really is. what are you hearing there sf. >> the rhetoric out of pyongyang is very hot. the question you raise is the one the administration has to take a look at. how real and dangerous is the nuclear threat? >> north korea's latest saber rattles threatening the south just one day after pyongyang said they will have missiles and conduct a new nuclear test leaving now doubt kim jung un is not giving up his father's nuclear program. >> they have the capability to conduct the tests in a way that make it very difficult to determine whether or not they are doing. >> there signs they are ready to test if ordered. >> they are maintaining fairly high state of readiness at the test site. if the order is given from pyongyang to go ahead, they can probably conduct the test in a few weeks. >> satellite shows a tunnel entrance where the device may undergo final assembly, a bunker for personnel and equipment and a
to the house of worship with the rebuilding needs. united states catholic conference has also endorsed the amendment and has made the point, you should glory, archbishop lori come a should be noted that in the aftermath of a natural disaster houses of worship often play an irreplaceable role to the recovery of the community. specifically the house of worship as ineligible for federal assistance in the wake of a national disaster. beyond being a legal violation hurts the very communities most affected by the indiscriminate force of nature. i would just point out again for the record that in new jersey alone, just the churches that have been devastated, some 145 churches have been damaged with a total of $19 million. this is a very simple fix. i thank you, mr. chairman. >> mr. pascrell. >> thank you, mr. chairman. good luck. >> i'm going to need it. tell me that out on a baseball field, too. >> that's a different story here. [laughter] i'm pleased that we are finally going to bring this bill to the floor. the northeast communities have already waited far too long for this to be approved
the history of smith & wesson, one of the largest gun manufacturers, handgun manufacturers in the united states that occurred in the 18 eighties in which with d.b. wesson, one of the founding partners of smith & wesson heard a story that the smith & wesson revolver was used by a child, when the child of the revolver to injure somebody. d.b. wesson found that unacceptable, so he told his son, joe wesson to design a child proof gun and the gun you see on the screen is the gun that joe wesson designed. if you look where the red arrow is, that is what is called the grip safety with. it is on the rearmost part of the gun that would have to be depressed by this area of your hand. my physician friends have taught me that is the eminence of the hand which i at first felt would be a middle eastern ruler. [laughter] but what this what fleshey part but have to push down the middle lever in order for the trigger to be told, and what smith & wesson called and said in this marketing material went to the smithsonian institute and we found their marketing materials from the 18 eighties they said and thi
a strong claim to presidential authority in the united states constitution. perhaps above all else the presidential duty is to keep the government from going to pieces, to do so, the president may even have to choose the least troubling option from a menu of unconstitutional choices, and this may be precisely the kind of constitutional interpretation that our current president is considering. a week away from his second inauguration, president obama is facing a series of roadblocks to going about the business of governing, from replacing outgoing cabinet members, to the ability to issue new debt, and the issue between the oval office and capitol hill has been proven intractable and how can he keep the government from going to pieces. two legal scholars may have a solution for the president particularly when it comes to the debt standoff. writing for the columbia law review, the authors write that in the debt ceiling deal context and given the balance of the practical stand prudential considerations, the least constitutional choice would be for the president to continue to issue deb
don't think there's been retaliation. but in the shortest way possible, the united states has said it will consider the extent of the damage done regardless of how it's done. whether it's done by a missile or a cyberattack. and we'll retaliate appropriately depending upon who did it and what they did, not how they did it. with regard to the weapons systems, the f-35 that you mentioned, vast amounts of the code for the f-35 systems were stolen before the plane ever flew. so, stolen by friendly asian government. [laughter] you may well think that in the future, if there were a war, if , weapons systems might roll out onto the battlefield and not work. >> thank you very much. we're out of time. thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> point we've seen over the years is not just economics, it's the discomfort that investigative reporting often causes in a news room. because it's troublesome. it's that more than the economics. if you're going to ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful, that
of allegiance to our flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding off icer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., january 4 , 2013. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: patrick j. leahy, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader is recognized. mr. reid: following leader remarks the national will recess to count the electoral votes. following that we're hopeful to complete action on part of the flood insurance -- [inaudible] the presiding officer: under the previous order the leadership time is reserved. the majority leader is recognized. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate stand in recess subject to the call of the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, t
standards. [speaking german] >> translator: quite often one will have to debate, for example, unit labor cost research, development, efficiency of administration and wage costs that fall within the realm of national sovereignty of the european union member states. the national parliaments would have to give political legit maasty so such -- legitimacy to such agreements that would then be binding so that we all know to what extent competitiveness in the euro area will be improved. there's another road that we shall embark on, namely we should do everything we can in order to insure increased mobility of our labor force within the european single market. we have barriers of language, we have barriers of portability, of social security systems, and this area the possibilities, the potential of a single market needs to be tapped also for a single labor market. and a third thing that we need to do. we have to respond to the question of how this single market, this european single market ought to look in order to be recognized as an important global player on international markets. so we must
the american people, began in 1964 when i served as first lieutenant in the united states army. then in both the legislative and executive branch positions in washington. the time has come for me to return to my wife sylvia, my three sons, it their families, our six grandchildren, and my walnut farm. dealing with a different set set of nuts. [laughter] i want to deeply think my family for giving me the fullest measure of love and support during my many absences the rat my long career in public service. -- throughout my long career in public service. i will leave with a sense of pride in what we have accomplished during these last four years, being on the president's national security team. as both director of the cia and the secretary of defense, i've always believed there are fundamental -- our fundamental measure is to keep america safe. because of the outstanding dedication of our intelligence and military professionals america is safer and more secure than it was four years ago. we have reached a turning point after more than one decade of war. as we reach that turning point, we develope
of the film and tv productions staying in the united states got a tax break, for example, also a tax break for the area or special tax is it the us for areas around the world trade center site. as we always have in very big legislation and important legislation, these things get tucked in there because they guarantee easier passage and some of them quite frankly are just extended, they're just almost like carbon copy extenders of things we have done before that have been languishing this year without a budget so the fiscal cliff bill, like all legislation, packed with these goodies. there's one thing in there that the business community is very, very interested in and i'd like to point out that to you, extension of modification of bonus depreciation. businesses can write off immediately half the value of their new investments, known as the 50% bonus depreciation. this is something that got business people, raised their attention. listen to what ned riley had to say about this. >> businesses have been holding off and waiting for the uncertainty of the fiscal cliff. we saw a nice bonus depre
san obama, do solemnly swear, that i will execute the office of the president of the united states faithfully. >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. " barack obama stopped and paused and smiled as if to say, come on, man, this is my big day. you have to get this right. unfortunately, he did not get it right so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time and they got it right. >> we walk for the history of democracy's big day monday at 8:00 a.m. and again at 8:00 p.m. eastern. this is part of a three-day holiday weekend on c-span 2's book-tv. >> the greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker. this honor now beckons america, the chance to lead the world at last out of the valley of turmoil and onto that high ground of peace that man has dreamed of since the dawn of civilization >> must embark on new progra
. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, three years have past since the supreme court's dreadful citizens united decision, and we have seen the dramatic increase in the amount of corporate money flowing into our elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the
as an opportunity for leverage to get those spending cuts that they didn't just get. the president of the united states says he's not going to play ball on that. he may unilaterally raise the debt and may lower the debt and there are a few options on the table so we'll have to see how that plays out. >> do you think he might invoke the constitution to prevent congress from holding him hostage? >> we have to see. the white house pretty much shut that down in december and november when there were discussions of possibly doing that especially when liberal democrats were suggesting he should do it and he had proposed and it was quickly shut down the possibility of being able to do this in the future without congressional approval and that was shut down not only by republicans, but also democrats who said how dare he think about it. i think it would be a radical move and only because there was some serious gridlock. >> jonathan, let's turn our focus now to the speaker. we covered speaker boehner. this is what the former speaker of the house had to say about him. let's take a listen on the other side.
, are united on this attitude to provide finance for publishing of books by copyright, or for having your own -- >> we certainly have an insight for the people that produce literature, people that produce history. but we are not in the business of making law. we also have an instinct for wanting to have access. so there's a distinction between, for example, supporting the concept of copyrights and whether they should last 85 years or longer. and what kind of access to digital capacities exist for books that are not being sold. these are really serious questions. because suddenly we have locked up in every library in america books that are not being sold that a lot of people would like to have access to, if it was free. and that's for digitization basically provides. and so to some degree people are going to have to come to grips with it. there's a secondary issue, by the way, in terms of the visual arts, where artists, families for extended periods of times have copyright in effect, powe powers, over great works of art. and how long that should last is a really powerful question. i will tell
time to examine those in detail. we haven't used the process that is in place here in the united states senate to go through committees and let the committees work through, is this essential to meeting the emergency needs? or can we set this aside and spend a little more time examining it, looking at it to make sure that this is how we want to go forward? we have a habit here of throwing money at things under an emergency category and then later finding out that, one, it wasn't an emergency where the money went. and, number two, it was misspent and not effective. we simply can't afford to keep doing this. once again i want to state we're not here trying to undermine funding for sandy, needed for sandy. some of the things the house did i think are legitimate in terms of saying let's set aside unrelated matters. it doesn't mean we cast them into the dust bin never to be seen again. it simply means let's let those that are not emergency situations be more carefully examined in terms of whether we need that. and if someone does come to the floor, as senator lee is going to do, is my underst
. >>> united states conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >>> the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. >>> we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >>> president barack obama, the 44th president, takes the oath of office to serve a second term. and we're here for all the tradition, pageantry and tradition "today," monday, january 21st, 2013. >> announcer: from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," the second inauguration of barack obama, with matt lauer and savannah guthrie live from washington, d.c. >>> and good monday morning to you, everyone. welcome to a special edition of "today" on a monday morning from capitol hill. as you look at the white house there, now the capitol. i'm matt lauer alongside savannah guthrie, natalie morales and mr. al roker. >> beautiful sunrise in washington. no matter who you voted for, this is an historic day for the country. little cold in the capital, but all along the country, people are starting to gather along the
, and the affected families will work to make our schools safer, stronger, and more united. that's why we're here today to prevent another sandy hook. we all have to work together to end gun violence. i hope we can continue that conversation today and make our children safer. thank you. >> i would like to thank our leader and co-chair for this honor. we come to this room today from different places and many different backgrounds. the last few months we have seen too many of our fellow countrymen gunned down in the streets. i represent camden, new jersey. a city of 80,000 have had 70 homicides this year. we see our neighbors die in shopping malls, movie theaters, college campuses and horrifically 31 days ago an elementary school. we are bonded together by one common conviction and that is our belief that is not inevitable. we can make choices to stop this from happening again. we believe that consistent with good medical practice, we can improve our mental health system so those who are tortured can get help. we believe that consist went good law enforcement practices we can make our campuses and
because the average single person over 65 has median income of about $18,000. over half of the units, a 65- years old and older, are central as opposed to couples. the couple's median income is only $44,000 so you cannot expect to get huge amounts of money by shifting costs on to them. >> i will give the audience a chance to ask a few questions. there will be microphones taken around and i would like you to wait until you get a microphone and please introduce yourself and make it a question and not a speech. right back here -- >> i am and dick miller -- what does anybody up there think about [inaudible] i understand the labels and expectations of having people in both houses of congress trying to work across the aisles, people in more of the middle. >> there are many bipartisan groups the deployed around. everyone on this panel has participated in some of them. do you see any opportunities at all coming from the stacse? >> ultimately, it is the only way out what we see in the congress is continued polarization and erosion of the blue dog democrats, the moderate democrats and we see, unfort
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